12/27/2021»»Monday

Microsoft Suite Causing New Mac To Freeze

12/27/2021
  1. The Cause Of
  2. Microsoft Suite Causing New Mac To Freeze Mac
  3. Caused

Imagine this: you’re working happily on your Mac when the dreaded beach ball of death appears. A program stops responding or worse, the macOS (or OS X) itself refuses to do anything but stare at you, blankly. You have a frozen Mac app or an OS X freeze. Mac OS not responding can lead to lost productivity or even lost work. Let's go over why it happens, what to do when your Mac freezes or when an Mac OS app stops responding, as well as some tips for preventative maintenance.

A Mac app may be running several processes at once, and some of them can freeze up. Depending on your Mac’s RAM capacity, there can be too many processes hindering its overall performance. Check the Activity Monitor to see the list of app-related or system processes running in the background and the memory consumption. Dec 29, 2019 How to Stop Your Mac from Freezing Up. This wikiHow teaches you how to prevent your Mac computer from freezing and displaying the rotating color wheel. While there are some steps you can take to fix a currently frozen Mac, outright. Nov 29, 2017 I purchased Microsoft Suite in 2011 for a new Macbook Pro computer. I just bought a new Mac computer and transferred from old to new. I keep getting ad for 365 but my previous Microsoft is not as it w read more.

We’ll go over frozen apps first, so if your whole Mac freezes, you can jump to the part about fixing a frozen Mac.

Office 365 plans include premium versions of these applications plus other services that are enabled over the Internet, including online storage with OneDrive and Skype minutes for home use. With Office 365 you get the full, installed Office experience on PCs, Macs. 2020-4-4  Excel 2010 comes with Freeze Row and Freeze Column features, which make it easy to match and read details of huge data sets. If you are dealing with huge datasheet containing student records, then you may want to freeze top row or first column to easily understand data while scrolling up / across the datasheet.

Fixing a frozen app: Why Mac OS apps freeze

There can be a few reasons why apps freeze on Mac. First, sometimes an app freezes on its own, and sometimes it takes down the whole Mac with it. Here's what could be happening:

  1. Apps freeze in the background.
    This could mean there are some apps running that you didn't open, they opened themselves. Probably, they're featured in your startup items, so they automatically launch when you start your Mac. If this happens repeatedly, you need to check what apps are running in the background and launch with the startup.
  2. Processes freeze in the background.
    This one is different from apps. One app may be running multiple processes, also system processes can be running on their own.
  3. Too many apps and processes running.
    Same logic as with the previous issue. But the question here is how many is too many? There is no definite answer to this, it very much depends on the hardware capacity of your Mac. You can read how to check it and fix it below.
  4. Mac system is too cluttered with junk to run even simple tasks.
    This is fixable, you can get a Mac optimizing app like CleanMyMac X for the job. Run a scan to find and remove the stuff you don't need, and there's a high change your apps will stop freezing after that.

What to do if an app freezes on your Mac

A frozen app becomes unresponsive and brings your work to a halt. In the worst case scenario, it can lead to lost work or a corrupted file. Fortunately, there are several options to try, and most are quite simple. Here’s what you can do when a program freezes on your Mac. First, you need to quit it. Then, if the app keeps freezing when you launch it, try the next options.

How to quit a frozen or unresponsive program

Quitting and then re-starting an app is a good way for Mac OS to handle a crash. You can do this from the OS X Dock or from the Force Quit window. To force-quit an app from the OS Dock, follow these simple steps:

  1. Click anywhere outside of the program
  2. Right-click (or Control-click) on the frozen app’s icon in the Dock. A menu appears.
  3. Hold down the Option key on your keyboard so that Quit in that menu changes to Force Quit.
  4. Select Force Quit.

That’s it. The app is instantly closed. Re-launch it and try again. If you prefer to work with the Dock hidden — or if the Dock itself is unresponsive — you can simply bring up the Force Quit dialog box to perform the same task.
Here’s how:

  1. On your Mac’s keyboard, hit the Option, Command and Escape keys simultaneously (alt + ? + esc).
  2. The Force Quit dialog box appears with a list of running programs.
  3. Select the frozen app and then click Force Quit.
  4. The software will stop running and you’re free to re-launch it at this point.

If you’re using a maintenance utility like CleanMyMac X, it has freezes covered. When CleanMyMac spots an unresponsive app, a notification window with a Quit button pops up, so you could force-quit the app without rummaging around in its menu.

CleanMyMac keeps an eye on other performance issues, too, so if you'd like to get alerts like this one when anything goes wrong, download CleanMyMac X for free and give it a try.

How to fix Mac apps that keep freezing

First, check what apps are running in the background and launch with the startup.
To do it go to Settings > Users and Groups > Login items.
Uncheck anything you think might be causing trouble. In fact, just to be sure, uncheck every app and restart your Mac.

Now, find out which process or program is causing the problem. How to see what programs are running on Mac in general? You need launch Activity monitor.
How to find Activity Monitor on Mac: You can do it via the Spotlight Search or just open Launchpad and type it in.
How to open Activity Monitor in Finder: launch it from Applications > Utilities folder > Activity Monitor.

When it opens, you'll probably see hundreds of processes in each tab, but the ones you need now are CPU and Memory tabs. Click on the % CPU sign to sort processes by their influence on your Mac's work. The heaviest ones will show up on the top. They could be your main issue, but don’t rush to deal with them. Some, like kernel, are important system processes and you shouldn’t mess with them.

How to kill a process on Mac OS

However, sometimes your problem does lie within a specific process, you can force quit it (Apple doesn't call it 'to kill a process on Mac', they make it sound fancy). But we're not at Apple HQ, so here's how to kill a Mac OS process:

  1. Open Activity Monitor.
  2. You see a list of processes. You can sort them by clicking on %CPU or % Memory in relevant tabs.
  3. Find the process you want to kill and choose it.
  4. Click on the octagon with an X sign.
  5. Done.

Occasionally the problem isn’t with the Mac app, but with the Mac OS itself. If you’re experiencing troubles regularly, it’s time to ask why your Mac keeps freezing. There are several possible reasons, so let’s start with the simplest potential solution.

First, the file you were working with at the time of the freeze may be the issue. To help determine if this is true, try opening a different file with that app and work with it for a while. If it behaves normally, quit and then go back to the file you were working with at the time of the crash. If the errant behavior persists, you may have found your problem. Salvage what you can into a new file.

Make sure that your software and OS X are up-to-date. This is easy to do with software purchased from the Mac App Store. The same goes for OS X. Launch the Mac App Store on your Mac, and you’ll see the list of pending updates, including any for the OS X itself. For third-party software purchased outside of the App Store, visit the manufacturer’s website.

What to do if Mac OS X freezes

If you cannot force-quit a program, or if the Mac OS is completely unresponsive, it’s time for the most obvious action — a reboot.
You can bring up the Restart/Sleep/Shutdown dialog box instantly by hitting Control plus the Power button. Option four, Shut Down, is selected by default.
Alternatively, you can press and hold the Power button for 1.5-2 seconds to bring up the same dialog box. If things aren’t hopelessly messed up, you’ll get a chance to save your work before your Mac shuts down. If that still doesn’t work, a more drastic option is available.

How to force reboot a frozen Mac

Press Command ?, Control and Power (on earlier MacBook models, use the Media Eject key instead of the Power button) to restart your Mac immediately. Note that you won’t have the option of saving anything in this scenario, but it will definitely reboot your icy Mac.

Once your Mac has restarted, you might find that the hard restart has corrupted the file you were working on. Salvage what you can from it and create a new file.

How to fix a frozen Mac

After the reboot, ensure that your Mac has enough free hard drive space for the OS X, and enough free RAM to do what you want. CleanMyMac X can help you here, too. It removes all the useless files that take up space on your hard drive: app leftovers, mail attachments, cache files, and so on. That way, you can free up additional disk space for the OS X without deleting any of your own files. Plus, CleanMyMac X keeps tabs on how much RAM you’re using and lets you free some up with a tap.

Finally, if system cleanup also fails to fix the problem, you can try to run a clean install of your Mac OS. Just follow the instructions: How to clean install macOS Sierra 10.12

Note: If you don’t know which system your Mac runs, click the apple icon in the top left corner and choose About this Mac. You’ll see the name on the popup window.

That’s it, we hope this guide has helped you fix a frozen Mac. Remember, with day-to-day maintenance, your Mac can offer years of reliable work. On the rare occasion of a frozen program or even frozen OS X, these tips will help get you working and productive again. And software like CleanMyMac X can do some of the monitoring and maintenance for you, so you can focus on what needs to be done.

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What’s more frustrating than a frozen Mac? One that stops working altogether.

When a MacBook Pro freezes, you can hit Command + Shift + Option + Escape to kill a frozen app or do a hard restart by holding the power button, but if those freezes keep happening, there’s a bigger underlying issue.

Some problems warrant a trip to an Apple Genius Bar, but there are actually quite a few simple things you can try yourself to fix a frozen MacBook.

From changes in computer habits to updating your macOS, here are five solutions to consider when your MacBook Pro keeps freezing.

1. Close Applications

Often, MacBook freezes aren’t caused by certain applications, but from running too many programs at once. A computer’s RAM (Random Access Memory) is the working memory, and when that fills up, it needs to reach into the hard drive space to operate. Besides making your MacBook Pro slow, filling up the RAM by multitasking can cause MacBook Pro freezes.

Once you’ve re-started your Mac from that freeze, open Activity Monitor (do a quick Spotlight Search to find it). Click on the Memory tab and take a look at the Memory Pressure graph on the bottom.

Green means you have enough RAM left to open additional programs, but once the graph starts turning yellow, you should close unnecessary programs or take a look at what applications are hogging your memory by looking at the programs listed above that graph. When you see red on that graph, your MacBook is using hard drive space, not RAM, to run, and a random or permanent freeze is likely coming if you don’t close out some applications.

Updating your physical RAM, especially with an older MacBook Pro (prior to 2013 models), would help, but that can get expensive and isn’t always necessary. Try identifying programs that are using the most memory and swapping them for an alternative like replacing Firefox with Safari. Avoid using multiple programs at once when possible, and limit the number of tabs you open when browsing the Internet.

2. Free up Disk Space

Click on the Apple icon in the upper left corner right now, then click About This Mac and go to the Storage tab. How much space do you have? To keep your MacBook Pro running at its peak, you should keep your disk drive no more than 85 percent full (source: Apple Support Communities).

If your disk is full, it’s time to delete unnecessary files and apps you don’t use anymore, or use an external drive to store files that you don’t access very often. Take a look at where your disk space is going with the color-coded graph to know where to start freeing up space. In my case, photos are usually the culprit, so I now store them on an external hard drive.

You can also use a third-party app like CleanMyMac to find and delete unnecessary files. It’s a fantastic app made by MacPaw that can help you reclaim tons of free disk space quickly.

An alternative app worth trying is CCleaner for Mac, it’s less powerful than CleanMyMac but offers more free cleaning features. You can find more Mac optimizers here.

3. Check Third-Party Software and Add-Ons

When does your MacBook Pro keep freezing? If your Mac is only freezing when you are using a certain program or only when you are surfing the Internet via a web browser, the issue might not be your MacBook at all.

Start by checking for updates for the program that’s causing all the issues and re-installing them. If that doesn’t fix the issue, try contacting the support team for that particular program.

You can also consider using a different program instead. Software developed by Apple tends to run much better on a Mac machine than a third-party program. For example, I managed to speed up my MacBook Pro and stopped an occasional freezing issue by swapping out Firefox for Safari. If you can identify a program that’s always open during the freezes, consider an alternative, like Apple Pages instead of Microsoft Office Word.

4. Update macOS

Running new programs (and even new websites) on an old operating system may cause computer freezes too — and so can bugs within the system itself. Apple now allows Mac users to download macOS updates for free — accessing the latest Mojave version could fix your freezing issue, provided your MacBook model is newer than 2012. Here are a few things to check before updating your MacBook Pro to the latest macOS Catalina (version 10.15)

One word of caution on OS updates first though — sometimes, the updates have a few bugs of their own. Make sure you back up your Mac using Time Machine so that in the unlikely event the update makes the issue worse, you can revert back to the old version while Apple fixes any bugs in the new system.

5. Run Apple Diagnostics or Hardware Test

The Cause Of

You don’t have to be a computer expert to diagnose just what’s wrong with your MacBook. If closing programs, freeing up drive space and updating software doesn’t help, try looking for hardware issues with Apple’s built-in testing. For newer MacBooks, the program is called Apple Diagnostics, but pre-2013 models will use Apple Hardware Test.

Follow the instructions from Apple based on the year of your computer (you can check the year by clicking the Apple icon then About This Mac). Since the process involves shutting down your computer, you may want to print out the instructions or access them for another device.

Once the process is complete, you’ll have an error code that you can use to determine where the issue is and exactly how to fix it. Write that code down before restarting your computer, you’ll use that code with Apple Support to determine the best solution.

Microsoft Suite Causing New Mac To Freeze Mac

Final Words​

MacBook Pro freezes are frustrating, and while sometimes paying for an extra RAM or SSD upgrade, or replacing an old MacBook altogether is the best plan of action, there are often a few things you can do to fix the issue without spending anything.

Check to see if you are simply multitasking beyond your computer’s abilities or if your hard drive is full. Pay attention to when the freezes happen — an application may be to blame, and not the Mac. You can also run diagnostics to identify hardware issues or update your software for the latest bug fixes from Apple.

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Hillary is a freelance technology writer and wedding photographer based in Michigan. She worked as a photojournalist for several years and then started her own business. While her favorite tech brands are Apple and Nikon, she enjoys exploring all but the most frustrating new devices.